Kingsley Holgate heads to Zambezi Delta on ‘Vision Mission’

Kingsley Holgate’s crew have loaded up their expedition Land Rovers and headed for Mozambique with their sturdy ‘Ma Robert’ inflatable pontoon boat in tow, to assist the non-profit Doctors For Life International (DFL) team in conducting free, life-changing, cataract operations in the Zambezi Delta, as part of DFL’s Aid to Africa programme.

The Kingsley Holgate Foundation is taking its Mashozi’s Rite to Sight programme to a new level with this campaign, called ‘Vision Mission’.

In keeping with using adventure to improve lives, the Kingsley Holgate Foundation’s focus on helping those with poor eyesight was started more than a decade ago by Mashozi (Gill) Holgate. ‘I remember the day clearly,’ says Kingsley.

‘We were on our 23° 27 Capricorn round-the-world-by-Land-Rover Expedition, in South America close to the Piranha River, in the company of a team of rangers. They told us that they were about to evict an old man who had lived all his life in a local village because he was becoming a danger to himself and others – he’d nearly burned down his hut several times whilst trying to light his stove. We went with them to the old man’s hut and sure enough, there he was, fumbling with a box of matches. The problem was – he couldn’t see properly.

‘I don’t know what made Mashozi think of it, but she suddenly rummaged in her big expedition bag, brought out a pair of her own basic readers and popped them on the old man’s nose. Miraculously, they were the perfect strength. A look of complete surprise came over his face, followed by a big, toothy grin as for the first time in years, he could see clearly again. There were claps and cheers from the rangers as the old man confidently struck the match, lit his stove and made us each a cup of coffee. The rangers allowed him to stay in his home and that was the start of our Mashozi’s Rite to Sight programme, named in her honour. Since then, it’s gone from strength to strength; after careful eye tests, we’ve distributed over 200,000 pairs of reading glasses to poor-sighted, mostly elderly people in remote areas all over Africa and beyond. The instant gratitude from the recipients and the immediate difference it makes in their lives is heart-warming.’

DFL has performed 2,500 eye surgeries throughout Africa over the past decade, helping to reverse blindness and dramatically change lives. This Zambezi Delta Vision outreach is in response to a call for help to assist blind people in the Marromeu, Luabo and Chinde areas. DFL and the Kingsley Holgate Foundation are transporting two mobile operating theatres to Marromeu on the banks of the Zambezi River, along with a team of volunteer doctors and nurses from South Africa and eSwatini, with the aim of conducting at least 200 cataract surgeries during August.

‘We are incredibly honoured to be a part of this humanitarian mission,’ says expedition leader Ross Holgate. ‘We know the Zambezi River well and our role will be to provide ground support. Using our three Land Rovers and the ‘Ma Robert’ boat, we’ll be criss-crossing the Zambezi Delta, conducting our normal malaria prevention and Mashozi Rite to Sight spectacle-distribution work, and at the same time, assessing patients that need more stringent, corrective eye surgery. The DFL doctors will train our expedition team on what cataract symptoms to look for and we will transport patients and their family members by water and road to the operating theatres, and then return them home after their eye surgery. It’s going to be a lot of hard work in difficult conditions with tricky logistics; just the amount of expedition kit, including the bolt-together ‘Ma Robert’ boat and medical equipment that’s being transported 2,000 kilometres to the Delta, is quite unbelievable.’

Also supporting this humanitarian effort is the non-profit Mercy Air group, which recently played a vital role in providing emergency air support after Cyclone Idai devastated central Mozambique, rescuing hundreds of victims and transporting tonnes of food, drinking water, medical supplies and personnel to flood-stricken communities. For this Zambezi Delta mission, Mercy Air is providing a helicopter and aeroplane to transport cataract patients living in inaccessible villages to the operating theatres by air.

‘The capabilities of our tried-and-tested Land Rover Discoverys and faithful old Defender 130 are really going to be needed,’ continues Ross. ‘These are the same vehicles that took us safely to Africa’s extreme easterly point in dangerous Somalia in 2017 and completed the 17,000-kilometre transcontinental Cape Town to Kathmandu expedition last year, making short work of below-freezing, high-altitude and snow-filled mountain passes. Then in April this year, they delivered tonnes of malaria prevention supplies and clean drinking water to flooded communities near Gorongosa National Park that were badly affected by Cyclone Idai.’

Zambezi Vision Mission at a glance:

3 Expedition Land Rovers

2 Mercy Air aircraft

2 Doctors For Life mobile operating theatres

1 large, inflatable pontoon-type ‘Ma Robert’ boat and tender

22 personnel

10 tonnes of equipment

2,000Km of rough roads

230Km of coastline and 18,000Km² of swamps, floodplains and savannah in the Zambezi Delta

200+ cataract operations

1,000 recipients of Mashozi’s Rite to Sight eye-testing and spectacle distribution.

 

Text and images: Kingsely Holgate Foundation – Link to article

 

Link to article –

Mozambique Medical Outreach May 2018

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Aid to Africa Mozambique Medical Outreach Update

In total we did 67 cataract eye surgeries on the first 2 days of the outreach being May the 14th and 15th. Two ladies told me that they had lost hope of ever seeing again after they had become blind. But this morning their sight was restored. It was a wonderful opportunity for us to share the gospel with them! At the end of the third day (May 16) we had completed 112 cataract surgeries. We were at the hospital from 7am until 6:15pm. By Gods grace all went well with the operations but not without a few challenges: Two of our medical machines, a keratometer and statim sterilizer packed up but thankfully the work can continue. We also ran out of some medical consumables but managed to procure more to finish our work. We had a blessed meeting with the Directorate of Health for the Inhambane province in the afternoon who expressed their appreciation for our work. They said the people are poor and needy and that we bring them hope. The country and health sector is in need of finances and resources and the outreach has already been broadcast on Mozambique national television. Mario Rocha said that after the devotion with the patients that many of them said see Gods hand in receiving their sight back. All glory to God. Today (May 17) we had two special surgery cases: a 1 year and a 4 year old child who were completely blind from cataracts. Children can be born with cataracts for various reasons. It is vitally important to remove them as soon as possible or the child could remain permanently blind. The outcome of these kinds of operations can be somewhat uncertain due to the child developing lazy eyes etc. We are thankful we could do these surgeries to give them a chance to see. Both eyes of both children were operated on. Thankfully Dr Pons brought a few special lenses along on the outreach without which these two surgeries would not have been possible! We have another child scheduled for tomorrow May 18. The good news is that Pieter Bos managed to get the Statim instrument sterilizer working again. We are aiming to do about 38 cases today and TV Mozambique came to do more interviews and filming in theatre for broadcasting. [su_custom_gallery source="media: 4619,4618,4617,4616,4615,4614,4613,4612,4611,4610,4609,4608,4607,4606,4605,4604,4603,4602,4601,4600,4599" limit="100" link="lightbox" width="150" height="150" class="lb_gal_thumbs"]  ]]>

Aid to Africa: Update

Inhambane, Mozambique, June 2017 Mrs Angelika Böhmer This was our third outreach at Inhambane hospital over the past four years and we have built good relationships with the local staff during this period. On our first outreach we were met with a degree of mistrust but this time we experienced a hearty welcome and excellent cooperation from our old friends there. Unfortunately, since our last outreach the local surgeon has left. This makes our intervention even more urgent because no cataract surgeries are done on a regular basis at the hospital anymore and the backlog becomes increasingly larger over time. Our team consisted of surgeon Dr. J. Pons from the Good Shepherd Hospital in Swaziland assisted by two of his ophthalmic nurses and an administrative lady, four helpers from our clinic at Zavora and two of us from South Africa. We spent long hours in theatre and were able to do 130 surgeries in five days. The team from Swaziland was very well organized for this mammoth task and it worked like a well-oiled machine! We thank them for their hard work and commitment and financial and other contributions! I’d like to mention a few highlights: Teresa* (age 34) had become blind due to cataracts some time ago. As a result, her husband left her even though she was pregnant. Her 9 year old son had to do many of the chores and even tried to do some jobs to earn a little bit of money. Life was very difficult for them. After her daughter was born she had to take care of her without being able to see and so a community worker brought her to the hospital. The morning after the surgery there was quite a commotion among the patients and spectators when for the first time this young mother was able to see her little baby who was then already about four months old. It’s easy to imagine what a difference the outreach made in the life of this little family. One of the patients who came for screening was Paolo*, a boy of 10 years old who had a cataract in his left eye. The hospital made an anaesthetist available so that Dr Pons could operate. Children of this age cannot have surgery under local anaesthetic and on other outreaches we have to send them away. We were very happy that we could help him and the next morning he was overjoyed when he could see. Another highlight for the team was our accommodation and we want to express our heartfelt thanks to the people who made it available to us. Much more could be said but space is limited. We thank God that we could do the work and that the gospel was preached. We pray His blessing on both. * Names changed for privacy reasons.

Aid to Africa, Personal Testimony

by Miss Mirjam Rüttimann During the weekend of the 28th to the 30th of July 2017 I was on duty at the maternity ward of the DFL clinic in Zavora and was called to the ward for a delivery. During this time Dr. Deborah and a friend of hers, Rebecca from Germany, were visiting us. They had told me to call them if there were labour cases and so I called them that evening. While we were busy preparing for the delivery another lady arrived. We only have one bed for deliveries so I put her into the maternity ward. When I checked how far she was with the labour I realized that the baby was laying feet first and this by full cervical dilatation! That’s a fearful diagnosis if one is out in the bush because it means that the lady needs a caesarean immediately. The chances that the baby would survive labour with feet first was not very high. I decided to immediately transfer her to the hospital in Inharrime but as we were preparing the transfer she started to push and the next moment the baby’s legs were out. So we had no chance to transfer her to the hospital and I could just pray that the child would survive the labour. I took the child by the legs and the next moment the child was born. The baby was crying and everything was fine. Then as we were waiting for the placenta we noticed that something was wrong. I checked again and found that there was another baby coming. It was twins!! I have never had a twin labour in my life, only through a caesarean. Everything went so well that we only can thank God! He is the best doctor and with Him everything is possible.]]>

Malawi medical outreaches 2017

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Petro Yasita used to be completely blind and received cataract surgery. He is the headman (chief) of 12 small villages. His smile speaks for itself…

We are so thankful to report that we just finished two successful medical outreaches in Malawi. Herewith just some brief feedback; The Doctors For Life International (DFL) teams camped at both places and each area offered its own challenges. The first outreach was near Mangochi (at the southern tip of lake Malawi). At first it was a challenge getting enough patients but the local tribal chiefs were very supportive and even brought patients to us! In total we saw about 725 eye patients. We did about 34 eye surgeries (cataract, trachoma and even cancer removals), treated 220 with eye drops and 267 received free reading and distance eye glasses. Dr Theunis Botha was the eye specialist and Miss Sandra Grunewald the ophthalmic nurse. Mrs Angelika Bohmer was the general nurse and microbiologist Mr Pieter Bos assisted with sterilization. Local Malawi medical staff also assisted. The school grounds where the team had to camp were especially open for health education sessions. Hundreds of children surrounded our campsite! The second area where we worked was more to the south in the Phalombe district, Mambala, on the eastern border of Malawi and Mozambique.

We worked there last year as well. The local Member of Parliament, the honourable MP Dennis Phiri gives us his full support in this remote and needy area. Dr Bruce Philips was the eye specialist and he was joined by his wife Nikki who assists him in his private practice. Miss Grunewald stayed on for the 2nd outreach as well, working with Dr Philips in the theatre. A total of 38 surgeries were performed under challenging conditions. Mr Bekanese, a Malawian ophthalmic technician also assisted at times. It was very hot and the temperature outside reached 40 degrees Celcius at times.

 

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We mostly did cataract surgery at the second place but in addition to the eye work the second team was also joined by dentist Dr Herbert de Graaf who pulled 345 teeth in one week! He also screened about 317dental patients. On the final evening the dental team worked until 11pm and even Dr Philips helped some dental patients with sutures after he was finished with the eye operations. About 200 patients received eye glasses and about 100 were helped with eye drops and medication. The community was extremely thankful and open to DFL’s help in the region. The medical work also opened new doors for sharing the love of Christ in these needy regions. Devotions were held before the start of the clinics each day and was received with open arms. Many children also attended the meetings at the schools where the teams camped. Lastly, we are making plans to move a specially designed mobile clinic to Malawi to start our second permanent clinic (our first one was started in Zavora Mozambique back in 2003). We plan to use the mobile clinic in Malawi, a large 4 ton unit pulled by a truck that was donated by medical Mission International, until we obtain sufficient funds to construct a building there also. We have been allocated land in a remote area called Chikuluma, near the Lewonde National Park. Our first step is to register DFL in Malawi and the process is underway. We are not sure how long this will take but we hope it won’t take too long!

Thank you to all who joined hands with us with on this Malawi medical outreach. Your contribution made a huge difference to the lives of the many people who can see again and the positive influence it has on whole communities.

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2016 Annual Report

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Introduction:

By Gods grace thousands of lives in Southern Africa were impacted during this past year. We are sincerely thankful for the privilege to play our small role in this. Free medical examinations and treatment, dental care, pre-and post natal care, vaccinations, optometry and eye care is just some of the basic, yet often life saving services provided free of charge. The eye surgery program has become one of our main focus areas with the medical services we offer. The focus here is preventable blindness for example cataract and trachoma surgery. Through this program, we were able to assist many blind people to see again. These individuals’ lives are changed in a dramatic way because of this. By curing blindness through surgery people can do basic things like, cooking, eating, walking, planting, washing, reading and driving again. They are also being able to work again, teach and live productive lives in their communities while making meaningful contributions to the society.

We would therefore like to thank you for your assistance, whether financially or through prayer, during past year. We could help so many that were needy. Your contributions enabled us to render a quality medical service to the under-privileged in remote regions. It is with much appreciation that we send you this 2016 Annual report for the Medical Outreach Program (section I) and the Sihane Clinic and Maternity Ward in Zavora, Mozambique (section II). With thankfulness, Johan Claassen

 

Medical Outreach Program

Medical Accomplishments

By Gods grace Doctors For Life International (DFL) could reach out to 3 Southern African countries this year: Botswana, Malawi and Mozambique. In Botswana and Malawi the focus was primarily on cataract and trachoma eye surgery. We also assisted a large number of people with eye glasses in Malawi. In Mozambique however, general medical care and eye glasses only was provided in about 3 remote and rural areas north of our Sihane clinic, that we used as a base. The areas were:

  1. Molepolole/Mahalapye in Botswana
  2. Chikuluma, Phalombe in Malawi
  3. Mambala, Mbonchera in Malawi
  4. Three (3) Small Districts in Inhambane province (Ligogo, Cumbana and Muvamba) in Mozambique

During the above missions DFL had the following achievements: * 378 surgical procedures of which 339 were cataract and 14 trachoma. This excludes approximately 100 extra sponsored cataract surgeries that would bring the total to 478 * 744 patients received prescription eye-glasses (dark, distance and reading) (This was 698 in 2015) * 1154 eye and general examinations. This excludes the 1000s that were screened in Botswana prior to the mission there. (1064+ in 2015) * 60 dental patients (474 in 2015)

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DFL Sihane (Zavora) Clinic
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Construction, maintenance and general improvements

A number of improvements and changes have been made at the DFL clinic and property during the past year. Most of these were sponsored by friends and family members of our fulltime medical staff working at the Sihane clinic. They came to volunteer their time and did most of the work themselves for which we are thankful. Some of these included:

  1. Two new car ports were added to protect equipment and vehicles from the blistering heat of the sun.
  2. Improved accommodation, concrete steps, electricity and security.
  3. Some paintwork were done at the clinic.
  4. Improved, repainted and changed workshop area.
  5. Improved medical storage area.
  6. Erected fence around whole clinic and property.
  7. Improved fruit and vegetable garden to grow food for staff.
[/cmsmasters_text][/cmsmasters_column][cmsmasters_column data_width=”1/2″ data_shortcode_id=”vvk0w0sngu”][cmsmasters_heading shortcode_id=”7wao2w8mbu” type=”h2″ font_weight=”default” font_style=”default” text_align=”left” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”20″ animation_delay=”0″]Medical Accomplishments[/cmsmasters_heading][cmsmasters_text shortcode_id=”mdm0mj98q” animation_delay=”0″]

We examined and treated about 21486 patients at our Zavora clinic during 2016. The quaterly reports showed: 1st quarter = 5748 patients 2nd quarter = 5962 patients 3rd quarter = 5405 patients 4th quarter = 4371 patients This is comparable to the amount of patients (21752) we had in 2015. During 2014 we saw 18229 and 12916 during 2013. Malaria positive cases remains to be high and the higest since the opening of the clinic. Diarrhoea is much lower due to the fact that these do not include diarrhoea caused by malaria or other diseases. In the past the diarrhoea would include these.

6008 Malaria cases (5597 in 2015, 4076 in 2014 and 5468 in 2013)
1st semester = 1446
2nd semester = 1796
3rd semester = 1497
4th semester = 1269

29 HIV cases – (19 in 2015, 67 in 2014, 68 in 2013)
1st semester = 5
2nd semester = 11
3rd semester = 8
4th semester = 5

245 Diarrhoea cases – (632 in 2015, 523 in 2014, 306 in 2013)
1st semester = 31
2nd semester = 82
3d semester = 73
4th semester = 59

3115 Vaccinations
1st – – – – –
2nd 891
3d 1113
4th 1111

Approximately 300 Eye Glasses
1st semester = —–
2nd semester = —–
3d semester = 150
4th semester = 100

3049 Wound care (1165 in 2015, 669 in 2014)
1st semester = 696
2nd semester = 836
3d semester = 838
4th semester = 679

There was also an increase in live births.

263 Babies were delivered compared to 241 in 2015, 231 in 2014, and 208 in 2013.
1st semester = 93
2nd semester = 57
3d semester = 71
4th semester =

42 MMI has basically sponsored the safe births of approximately

1282 babies since the official opening of the maternity ward in 2009.

 

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2015 Annual Report

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Introduction:

It is with much appreciation that we send you this 2015 Annual report for the Medical Outreach Program (section I) and the DFL Sihane Clinic and Maternity Ward in Zavora, Mozambique (section II). With your assistance we were able to reach many lives in Southern Africa during this time. We are sincerely thankful to be able to play our small role in this. General medical examinations and internal medicine, dental care, free medication and treatment, pre-and post natal care, vaccinations, optometry and eye care is just some of the basic, yet often life saving services also provided free of charge. The eye surgery program has become a major part of our medical services. We were able to assist many blind people to see again.

These individuals’ lives are changed because of this. From basic things like, cooking, eating, walking, planting, washing to being able to work again, drive, read, teach and once again live productive in their communities. We would therefore like to thank you for partnering with us in the past year to help so many that are needy. With the assistance of Hartman, we were able to use quality medical products to assist the under-previlaged in rural and remote regions.

Johan Claassen Date: 2016-01-20 Mobile: +27 (0) 83 458 2949 Email: [email protected]

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Medical Outreach Program

Medical Accomplishments

3 Areas remote and needy areas were reached with the main focus on eye surgery. At the fourth area we focused only on eye glasses.

  1. Inhambane in Mozambique
  2. Mauzi, Phalombe in Malawi
  3. Namandanje, Mbonchera in Malawi
  4. Sihane, Zavora in Mozambique

During these missions the following accomplishments were made: 162 surgical procedures of which most were cataract surgery on blind people. 3 surgeries to remove eye cancer. 698 patients received prescription eye glasses 212 internal medicine examinations (General practitioner examinations) 1064+ eye examinations. 200+ indirect eye examinations through the surgery in Inhambane We did not received those stats from the government 474 dental Patients 595 Teeth Extractions

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Medical Accomplishments

We examined and treated about 21 752 patients at our Zavora clinic during 2015. This is a new record compared to only 18229 during 2014 and 12916 during 2013. Part of the increase is the huge number of malaria cases we saw. The Mozambique government calls it a malaria pandemic. Basically most (except HIV/AIDS) number of conditions increased. 5597 were Malaria cases – (4076 in 2014, 5468 in 2013) 19 HIV cases – (67 in 2014, 68 in 2013) 632 Diarrhoea cases – (523 in 2014, 306 in 2013) 1165 Wound care (669 in 2014) There was also an increase in live births. 241 Babies were delivered compared to 231 in 2014, and 208 in 2013. Over the past few years since the clinic was constructed by SODA. We have passed the “one thousand” mark!

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Doctors For Life Newsletter, Issue 9 – March. 2015

From the CEO’s desk The year 2014 ended on a victorious note for us here at Doctors for Life. It was indeed a blessed year and we are thankful towards our Heavenly Father for supplying all our needs. We indeed look forward to the many challenges ahead of us in 2015. With your support and prayers we will endeavour to fulfill our vision of helping those in need. Although we don’t live in optimistic times we are amazed at the doors that are opening up and the blessed way in which we are able to deliver services to the needy. One of the most rewarding things in life, as individuals, is to make a difference in the lives of other people, even if it means sometimes leaving our comfort zone. Obstacles seem small when we experience the rewards of our efforts. Thanks to our sponsors and other members who make it possible for us to continue with the work.

A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step.”

Chinese philosopher Lao-tzu

Our legal corner

Doctors For Life wins Court Application against Starsat and ICASA

In last year’s application which Doctors for Life (DFL) brought for the review of the granting of a license by ICASA (broadcasting authority) for three TV channels for the exclusive broadcast of pornography, judgment in the Western Cape High Court went against Online Digital Media (ODM), owner of the Starsat brand (formally TopTV) and ICASA .

Although DFL is disappointed that the judge did not find it necessary to go into the merits and desirability of airing pornography over television, about which DFL had made a case proving scientifically that pornography is physically harmful for the human brain, it is none the less pleased that the judge held that there was an error in law in the course of the procedure followed by ICASA in granting the license.

Judgment was given on 3 November 2014, the result of which is that Starsat from that date ceased to broadcast its porn channels. Its options were to resubmit its license application to ICASA or lodge an appeal against the court’s decision. It decided to do the latter and an application for leave to appeal was brought before the judge in the same court, which application was strenuously opposed by DFL’s legal team. On 10 December 2014 the judge dismissed the application with costs.

However, Starsat is not giving up; it has launched a petition to the Supreme Court of Appeal in Bloemfontein where it hopes that the Appeal Court will allow it to appeal the Western Cape Court’s decision. As at publishing this newsletter, documents are being drafted by DFL’s legal team to oppose the petition. In the meantime, the legal team is also investigating the legality of continued broadcasting of the porn channels while Starsat is petitioning the appeal court.

Should the appeal court grant Starsat leave to appeal, we shall be faced with a full appeal in the Supreme Court of Appeal with the legal team transferring its endeavors to Bloemfontein. Please continue to pray for victory against this evil. DFL’s legal team consisted of Advocates Reg Willis and Albert Mooij, as instructed by attorney S J M Schneider assisted by Naomi Marais.

The pornography debate

A large segment of the population has serious concerns about the effects of pornography in society and challenges its public use and acceptance. There are many different opinions but one consistent finding is that adults prefer to have the material restricted from children, the production of it as well as the use of it. To produce pornography you need actors and in this case children are used. The vast majority of children who appear in child pornography have not been abducted or physically forced to participate. [1] In most cases they know the producer—it may even be their father—and are manipulated into taking part by more subtle means. Nevertheless, to be the subject of child pornography can have devastating physical, social, and psychological effects on children.[2]

The children portrayed in child pornography are first victimized when their abuse is perpetrated and recorded. They are further victimized each time that record is accessed. In one study,[3] 100 victims of child pornography were interviewed about the effects of their exploitation—at the time it occurred and in later years. Referring to when the abuse was taking place, victims described the physical pain (e.g., around the genitals), accompanying somatic symptoms (such as headaches, loss of appetite, and sleeplessness), and feelings of psychological distress (emotional isolation, anxiety, and fear). However, most also felt a pressure to cooperate with the offender and not to disclose the offense, both out of loyalty to the offender and a sense of shame about their own behavior. Only five cases were ultimately reported to authorities. In later years, the victims reported that initial feelings of shame and anxiety did not fade but intensified to feelings of deep despair, worthlessness, and hopelessness. Their experience had provided them with a distorted model of sexuality, and many had particular difficulties in establishing and maintaining healthy emotional and sexual relationships.

For more information go to the following website: http://www.popcenter.org/problems/child_pornography/2

1. Lanning, K. V., & Burgess, A. W. (1989). Child pornography and sex rings. In D. Z. J. Bryant (Ed.), Pornography: Research advances and policy considerations (pp. 235–255). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

2. Klain, E.J., Davies, H.J. and Hicks, M.A. (2001) American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law for the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

3. Silbert (1989). The Psychology of Cyber Crime: Concepts and Principles: Concepts and Principles, edited by Kirwan, Gráinne. November 30, 2011.

Abortion: things they never tell us

The abortion debate is the ongoing controversy surrounding the moral and legal status of abortion. The two main groups involved in the abortion debate are the self-described “pro-choice” movement (emphasizing the right of women to choose whether to abort a pregnancy or to grow it to term) and the self-described “pro-life” movement (emphasizing the right of the embryo or fetus to gestate and be born). Both of these ascription’s are considered loaded terms in mainstream media where terms such as “abortion rights” or “anti-abortion” are generally preferred.[1] Each movement has, with varying results, sought to influence public opinion and to attain legal support for its position, with small numbers of anti-abortion advocates sometimes using violence.

Abortion law varies between jurisdictions. For example, in Canada abortion is available to women without any legal restrictions,[2] while in Ireland abortions are illegal except when a woman’s life is at imminent risk[3] and Chile bans abortion with no exception for the life of the pregnant woman.[4]

The emotional and psychological effect on women who has, had an abortion often outweighs the immediate physical advantages experienced by such women. Some regret the abortion soon after it has happened and some only years after the abortion.

The following is a list of potential emotional and psychological side effects of an abortion. The intensity or duration of these effects will vary from one person to another. Potential side effects include: [5]

  • Regret
  • Anger
  • Guilty feelings
  • Shame
  • Sense of loneliness or isolation
  • Loss of self confidence
  • Insomnia or nightmares
  • Relationship issues
  • Suicidal thoughts and feelings
  • Eating disorders
  • Depression

For more information visit the following webpage: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abortion_debate

1. Wall Street Journal style guide: Vol. 23, No. 1. Wall Street Journal. 2010-01-31. Retrieved 2011-11-04. 

2. Dictionary.com. Retrieved 2007-05-01. (1) the right of a woman to have an abortion during the first six months of a pregnancy; (2) an abortion performed on a woman solely at her own request 

3. Divisions deep over abortion ban. BBC News. Archived from the original on 27 March 2010. Retrieved 2010-03-30.

4. Abortion Policies: A Global Review, UN

5. Adler, Nancy. (1989) University of California at San Francisco, Statement on Behalf of the

American Psychological Association before the Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations

Subcommittee of the Committee on Governmental Operations, U.S. House of Representatives:

130-140.

A personal testimony

About 3 months ago I was asked to visit a family that lives about 40 to 50 km away from Sehane/Zavora in Mozambique. The family was inquiring about the Gospel. They are related to a family that comes to our services. We arranged for a specific day and arrived a little late. The place is on the Southern side of the Poelela Lake in the bush. When we arrived there were a great number of people. They were just starting to eat. We were greeted very warmly and they invited us to eat with them. After the meal the leader of the family told me he had invited all his close family and friends and that they were ready to hear what God had to say to them. This was very special and a few people came for help after the service. I visited them again just before I came to South Africa and they have also started to visit us. There are many spiritual needs in these areas. As far as I am concerned the greatest problem is poverty and it is mostly caused by ancestor worship and witchcraft. Regarding our needs at the Clinic we are in need of a Christian medical doctor and nursing sisters. There are people interested. We will see how the Lord leads We also need volunteers that can help with general maintenance work. Mario Rocha, permanent DFL worker stationed at Zavora clinic

Aid to Africa (A2A) Outreaches 2014-2015

Our medical outreach program, Aid to Africa, seems to have a full year ahead. But first we would like to give some feedback on 2014. By God’s grace we were able to reach 5 needy areas in neighboring countries with the main focus on eye surgery:004

1. Inhambane in Mozambique

2. Maun (and Ghantsi) in Botswana

3. Nambazo in Malawi

4. Mbonchera in Malawi

5. Muvamba in Mozambique

Altogether we performed 423 surgical procedures (an annual record) of which most were cataract surgery on blind people. 652 prescription eye glasses were handed out and 212 internal medicine examinations (GP examinations) could be performed. We have on record an estimated 1889 eye examinations that were done. Due to intensive eye campaigns done in Botswana and Mozambique there were many more examinations but we do not have a record of all of them because we did not received the stats from the governments involved.

AT our Zavora clinic and Maternity ward in Mozambique we examined and treated roughly 18 391 patients compared to only 12 916 during 2013. Of these most were malaria cases (3594). We also had about 231 babies delivered bringing the total to about 889 since the opening of the clinic.

During 2014 we also were able to source an A-scan, Keratometer and Autorefractor in order to do biometry during the cataract surgery camps. We also received another eye microscope for eye surgery.

Looking at 2015, March has been put aside for medical congress exhibitions where DFL has an opportunity to recruit volunteers for this year’s medical outreaches. The congresses include the Ophthalmological Society of South Africa (OSSA), and for the first time The South African Dental Association (SADA), both at the ICC in Durban. As in the past, we also hope to attend the South African Medical Association (SAMA) later in the year. Please come to visit our booth if you are there.

While our Zavora clinic and maternity ward continues to operate in Mozambique we are desperately in need of medical volunteers to help there. We currently don’t have someone there accept for the local Mozambique staff. We especially need nurses, midwives and GP’s. Please contact us if you are interested or know of someone who might be.

We are also planning at least 4 short term medical outreaches for 2015 with the first one in July to Malawi. Although the focus will be eye surgery we are also looking for dentists and GP’s to join us.

Next in line is an eye surgery camp in Xai-Xai in Mozambique where we hope to do about 100 cataract operations. Later in the year in about October and November we hope to reach remote areas in Zambia, Angola or Botswana. If you are interested in getting involved in any of these please let us know.

Thank you for all your prayers and support.

Devotion

In Genesis 27:30: we read that Esau said …………. “Please, father, sit up and eat some of the meat that I have brought you, so that you can give me your blessing.”

Esau had a strange way about him. He kept honoring the faith of his fathers in the sense that he did not go to the idols for a blessing. At least not as far as we know. No, he went to his father Isaac. And he was quite desperate for it, in the sense that he cried out loud and wept in order to get it. But there was another side to Esau. When it came to marriage he wanted to select a girl after his own liking and not after God’s guidance. We read that it grieved Isaac and Rebecca that he chose a wife from the Hittites. Therefore the Bible calls him profane. Throughout his life he intimated that he neither desired the blessing nor dreaded the curse of God. To be profane is to combine the sacred and the blasphemous. He wanted the Lord’s blessing while living his life as he choose. Esau is a typical example of the generation of today. May the Lord grant us the grace to be different. To live lives that are holy and totally surrendered to God’s will. What were our lives like during the previous year and what about 2015?

About Doctors For life

[su_box title="About Doctors For life"]Doctors For Life International is a non-governmental and registered Non-Profit making Organization (NPO) established in 1991. We bring together medical professionals to form a united front to uphold the following three principles: · The sanctity of life from conception till death · Sound science in the medical profession · A Basic Christian ethic in the medical profession Contact details PO Box 6613 Phone +27 (32) 4815550 or 1/2/3 Zimbali Fax +27 (32) 4815554 4418 Email: [email protected] South Africa web: www.doctorsforlife.co.za[/su_box]

Prayer Requests

· God’s blessing on the work

· Laborers to send into the field

· Medical volunteers for Zavora clinic (Mozambique)

To sign up or donate

visit our website

www.doctorsforlife.co.za

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